New Study Shows The Apple Watch Can Help Detect Heart Beats Problem.

New Study Shows The Apple Watch Can Help Detect Heart Beats Problem.

A new study has revealed that the Apple Watch can detect an abnormal heart rhythm problem.

The study conducted by the heart rate app-maker Cardiogram and the UCSF Health lab revealed that when paired with neural network algorithms, the Apple Watch is 97 percent accurate in detecting paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF).




Furthermore, the watch might also help to prevent strokes in susceptible patients... Cardiogram initiated the study with UCSF in 2016 to discover whether the Apple Watch could detect an oncoming stroke.

The University of California, San Francisco conducted a study on 6,158 Apple Watch users recruited through the Cardiogram app on Apple Watch. The study showed that most users had normal EKG readings. However, 200 were diagnosed with paroxysmalatrial fibrillation (an abnormal heartbeat). AF condition that made their hearts beat erratically.

New Study Shows The Apple Watch Can Help Detect Heart Beats Problem.



Cardiogram initiated the study with UCSF back in 2016 to discover whether the Apple Watch could detect an oncoming stroke.

Engineers used the 6,158 participants to train a deep neural network to identify patients with arrhythmia versus those with normal heartbeats using the Apple Watch heart rate data.




Cardiogram tested the deep neural network it had built against 51 in-hospital cardioversions (a procedure that restores the heart’s normal rhythm) and says it achieved a 97 percent accuracy in the neural network’s ability to find irregular heart activity. All used an Apple Watch and 12-lead ECG prior to and after the procedure. The AI algorithm and Apple Watch were able to identify AF with 97 percent accuracy and 98 percent sensitivity, according to the study.

The study is built on a preliminary algorithm but the reseach holds promise in trying to identify and prevent stroke in the future since more people, including older populations most prone to stroke risk, are starting to use wearable technology. Two-thirds of strokes can be prevented with cheap drugs, but algorithms trained to identify heart problems could help save lives in some of these more at-risk populations.



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